Cora Wilson Stewart and Kentucky's Moonlight Schools

Book Cora Wilson Stewart and Kentucky's Moonlight Schools
Book Title
Cora Wilson Stewart and Kentucky's Moonlight Schools
Publisher
University Press of Kentucky
Author
Yvonne Baldwin
ISBN
0813171652
Pages
270
Publish Date
2006-03-03

The first woman elected superintendent of schools in Rowan County, Kentucky, Cora Wilson Stewart (1875–1958) realized that a major key to overcoming the illiteracy that plagued her community was to educate adult illiterates. To combat this problem, Stewart opened up her schools to adults during moonlit evenings in the winter of 1911. The result was the creation of the Moonlight Schools, a grassroots movement dedicated to eliminating illiteracy in one generation. Following Stewart’s lead, educators across the nation began to develop similar literacy programs; within a few years, Moonlight Schools had emerged in Minnesota, South Carolina, and other states. Cora Wilson Stewart and Kentucky’s Moonlight Schools examines these institutions and analyzes Stewart’s role in shaping education at the state and national levels. To improve their literacy, Moonlight students learned first to write their names and then advanced to practical lessons about everyday life. Stewart wrote reading primers for classroom use, designing them for rural people, soldiers, Native Americans, prisoners, and mothers. Each set of readers focused on the knowledge that individuals in the target group needed to acquire to be better citizens within their community. The reading lessons also emphasized the importance of patriotism, civic responsibility, Christian morality, heath, and social progress. Yvonne Honeycutt Baldwin explores the “elusive line between myth and reality” that existed in the rhetoric Stewart employed in order to accomplish her crusade. As did many educators engaged in benevolent work during the Progressive Era, Stewart sometimes romanticized the plight of her pupils and overstated her successes. As she traveled to lecture about the program in other states interested in addressing the problem of illiteracy, she often reported that the Moonlight Schools took one mountain community in Kentucky “from moonshine and bullets to lemonade and Bibles.” All rhetoric aside, the inclusive Moonlight Schools ultimately taught thousands of Americans in many under-served communities across the nation how to read and write. Despite the many successes of her programs, when Stewart retired in 1932, the crusade against adult illiteracy had yet to be won. Cora Wilson Stewart presents the story of a true pioneer in adult literacy and an outspoken advocate of women’s political and professional participation and leadership. Her methods continue to influence literacy programs and adult education policy and practice.

Moonlight Schools for the Emancipation of Adult Illiterates

Book Moonlight Schools for the Emancipation of Adult Illiterates
Book Title
Moonlight Schools for the Emancipation of Adult Illiterates
Publisher
Wentworth Press
Author
Cora Wilson Stewart
ISBN
9780469032682
Pages
258
Publish Date
2019-02-20

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Cora Wilson Stewart

Book Cora Wilson Stewart
Book Title
Cora Wilson Stewart
Publisher
McFarland
Author
Willie Nelms
ISBN
9780786403349
Pages
239
Publish Date
1997-08-01

In 1911 Cora Wilson Stewart founded the Moonlight Schools in Rowan County, Kentucky, an innovative night program that taught illiterate adults to read. Hoping that 150 people would attend the first classes, Stewart was amazed that over 1,200 men and women enrolled. She quickly developed reading material for these men and women that appealed to them instead of the children's texts that most educators were using with adults. With the success of the Moonlight Schools, Stewart moved forward in her crusade against illiteracy; she quickly became the most prominent advocate for the cause on both the national and international scene. Stewart took the fight against illiteracy at a time when it was an accepted part of American life. She shocked the nation when she pointed out that 25 percent of the men who signed up for the draft in 1917 could neither read nor write. From her beginnings in the mountains of Kentucky, she went on to chair the Illiteracy Section of the World Conference of Education Associations five times; she founded the National Illiteracy Crusade in 1926. She even received one vote for president at the 1920 Democratic convention. Her crusade came despite the fact she was a victim of domestic abuse who suffered through three failed marriages. Her life reflects the challenges faced by female reformers in the early part of the 20th century.

Mary Breckinridge

Book Mary Breckinridge
Book Title
Mary Breckinridge
Publisher
UNC Press Books
Author
Melanie Beals Goan
ISBN
146960664X
Pages
360
Publish Date
2012-09-01

In 1925 Mary Breckinridge (1881-1965) founded the Frontier Nursing Service (FNS), a public health organization in eastern Kentucky providing nurses on horseback to reach families who otherwise would not receive health care. Through this public health organization, she introduced nurse-midwifery to the United States and created a highly successful, cost-effective model for rural health care delivery that has been replicated throughout the world. In this first comprehensive biography of the FNS founder, Melanie Beals Goan provides a revealing look at the challenges Breckinridge faced as she sought reform and the contradictions she embodied. Goan explores Breckinridge's perspective on gender roles, her charisma, her sense of obligation to live a life of service, her eccentricity, her religiosity, and her application of professionalized, science-based health care ideas. Highly intelligent and creative, Breckinridge also suffered from depression, was by modern standards racist, and fought progress as she aged--sometimes to the detriment of those she served. Breckinridge optimistically believed that she could change the world by providing health care to women and children. She ultimately changed just one corner of the world, but her experience continues to provide powerful lessons about the possibilities and the limitations of reform.

Why We Fought

Book Why We Fought
Book Title
Why We Fought
Publisher
University Press of Kentucky
Author
Peter C. Rollins,John E. O'Connor
ISBN
081312493X
Pages
604
Publish Date
2008

Looks at war films, from depictions of the American Revolution to portrayals of September 11 and its aftermath. This volume contrasts recognized history and historical fiction with the versions appearing on the big screen. It reveals how film depictions of the country's wars have shaped our values, politics, and culture.

Ohio Valley History

Book Ohio Valley History
Book Title
Ohio Valley History
Publisher
Author
N.A
ISBN
Pages
N.A
Publish Date
2006

Appalachian Journal

Book Appalachian Journal
Book Title
Appalachian Journal
Publisher
Author
N.A
ISBN
Pages
N.A
Publish Date
2006

A regional studies review.

The Paradox of Southern Progressivism, 1880-1930

Book The Paradox of Southern Progressivism, 1880-1930
Book Title
The Paradox of Southern Progressivism, 1880-1930
Publisher
Univ of North Carolina Press
Author
William A. Link
ISBN
9780807862995
Pages
464
Publish Date
2000-11-09

Focusing on the cultural conflicts between social reformers and southern communities, William Link presents an important reinterpretation of the origins and impact of progressivism in the South. He shows that a fundamental clash of values divided reformers and rural southerners, ultimately blocking the reforms. His book, based on extensive archival research, adds a new dimension to the study of American reform movements. The new group of social reformers that emerged near the end of the nineteenth century believed that the South, an underdeveloped and politically fragile region, was in the midst of a social crisis. They recognized the environmental causes of social problems and pushed for interventionist solutions. As a consensus grew about southern social problems in the early 1900s, reformers adopted new methods to win the support of reluctant or indifferent southerners. By the beginning of World War I, their public crusades on prohibition, health, schools, woman suffrage, and child labor had led to some new social policies and the beginnings of a bureaucratic structure. By the late 1920s, however, social reform and southern progressivism remained largely frustrated. Link's analysis of the response of rural southern communities to reform efforts establishes a new social context for southern progressivism. He argues that the movement failed because a cultural chasm divided the reformers and the communities they sought to transform. Reformers were paternalistic. They believed that the new policies should properly be administered from above, and they were not hesitant to impose their own solutions. They also viewed different cultures and races as inferior. Rural southerners saw their communities and customs quite differently. For most, local control and personal liberty were watchwords. They had long deflected attempts of southern outsiders to control their affairs, and they opposed the paternalistic reforms of the Progressive Era with equal determination. Throughout the 1920s they made effective implementation of policy changes difficult if not impossible. In a small-scale war, rural folk forced the reformers to confront the integrity of the communities they sought to change.

The Journal of Southern History

Book The Journal of Southern History
Book Title
The Journal of Southern History
Publisher
Author
Wendell Holmes Stephenson
ISBN
Pages
N.A
Publish Date
2006

Includes section "Book reviews."

A Separate Sisterhood

Book A Separate Sisterhood
Book Title
A Separate Sisterhood
Publisher
Peter Lang Pub Incorporated
Author
Katherine Chaddock Reynolds,Susan L. Schramm-Pate
ISBN
Pages
213
Publish Date
2002

A Separate Sisterhood examines the personal lives and professional accomplishments of a group of wise and persistent women whose collective work in the early twentieth century crucially influenced educational reform in the New South. Working at the intersection of race, gender, and class, these women fought for educational improvement in a region of exceptional poverty, rural isolation, and racial prejudice. Their work, explored collectively for the first time in this groundbreaking text, demonstrates the roots of early advances in southern literacy education, vocational education, community outreach education, adult education, equal educational opportunity, curricular integrity, public support, and teacher pay equity.

Appalachia/America

Book Appalachia/America
Book Title
Appalachia/America
Publisher
Author
Wilson Somerville
ISBN
Pages
250
Publish Date
1981

The Bibliography of Appalachia

Book The Bibliography of Appalachia
Book Title
The Bibliography of Appalachia
Publisher
McFarland
Author
N.A
ISBN
Pages
222
Publish Date
2009-01-30

"This bibliography of books, articles, monographs, and dissertations features more than 4,700 entries, divided into twenty-four subject areas such as activism and protest; Appalachian studies; arts and crafts; community culture and folklife; education; environment; ethnicity, race and identity; health and medicine; media and stereotypes; recreation and tourism; religion; and women and gender. Two indexes conclude the bibliography"--Provided by publisher.

International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature in the Humanities and Social Sciences 2008

Book International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature in the Humanities and Social Sciences 2008
Book Title
International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature in the Humanities and Social Sciences 2008
Publisher
De Gruyter Saur
Author
K. g. Saur
ISBN
9783598694295
Pages
2952
Publish Date
2008-12-12

The IBR, published again since 1971 as an interdisciplinary, international bibliography of reviews, offers book reviews of literature dealing primarily with the humanities and social sciences published in 6,000 mainly European scholarly journals. This unique bibliography contains over 1.1 millions book reviews. 60,000 entries are added every year with details on the work reviewed and the review.

The Book Review Digest

Book The Book Review Digest
Book Title
The Book Review Digest
Publisher
Author
N.A
ISBN
Pages
N.A
Publish Date
2007

Perspectives on Curriculum Development, 1776-1976

Book Perspectives on Curriculum Development, 1776-1976
Book Title
Perspectives on Curriculum Development, 1776-1976
Publisher
Author
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Yearbook Committee,ASCD 1976 Yearbook Committee,Ozro Luke Davis,Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
ISBN
Pages
277
Publish Date
1976

Gracias

Book Gracias
Book Title
Gracias
Publisher
CreateSpace
Author
Adriana Falcon Trafford
ISBN
9781481139748
Pages
278
Publish Date
2013-05-22

Gracias: a Collection of Family Memories introduces the reader to Adriana Falcón Trafford's life history, her struggles, and the family that gave her roots and wings to start a new life in her adopted country at age 40. Adriana's memoir grew out of ten years of writing and reflecting on her experiences in Chile and the United States; it is also the story of her family, spanning four generations. Written for her Chilean and American families and readers everywhere, this is Adriana's first book.